4/2/2014

Early conceptions of the design+make website revolved around self promotion and design validation. Hopes were to develop a medium for students and professionals to witness the fantastic work designed and realized (or sometimes just designed) by previous years, as well as a platform to spotlight ongoing design efforts. In essence, the goal was to create a digital museum to memorialize design+make and its accomplishments...  (more)

4/1/2014

As a fifth year graduate student, I highly appreciate that the College of Architecture, Planning and Design provides a vast span of architectural typologies to study. In our first four academic years, we designed civic, institutional, cultural, environmental, religious, and housing projects. Consequently, our graduates are typically competent working in firms that practice in these realms. However, can we confidently say we are ready to be a comprehensive architect? My answer is “not quite”...  (more)

3/31/2014

Bryan Bell, architect and creator of Design Corps defines public interest design as “providing benefits of architecture to those traditionally un-served by the profession”. This concept has evolved from designing for inclusion, originally articulated by Ronald Mace, who used the phrase universal design. Public interest design differs by adding another layer pertaining to social sustainability. In this model a designer aims to create equitable, diverse, connected and democratic means leading to a better quality of life...  (more)

3/30/2014

The link – known to the tenants of Seaton as the corridor connecting Seaton Hall and Seaton Court. This corridor, essentially a catwalk, provides a unique vantage point of the College of Architecture’s shop located on the floor below. For many students this is as close as they get to interacting with the shop, however, as they pass by, they will observe members of design+make welding, grinding, sawing or more likely, dismantling a pallet. With the means available to us, design+make tries to utilize this space to its full potential. We treat it as our second studio...  (more)

3/29/2014

Previous Posts

Computer Numerical...

Theory & Feasibility

Designing Never Stops

Telling Your Story

Social Media

Herding Cats: A Lesso...

What is a Designer's...

Digital Design_Hand D...

Understanding Materi...

All Night? All Right?

Construction Safety

Communicating in the...

A Future for Seaton Hall

Biophilic Design

2 Pavilions: Diverging...

The Value of Shop Dra...

Stretching the Mold

Sacred Space

What we can Learn...

Women in the "Making"

Failing Fast & Failing...

The Power of Mock...

The Next Chapter

Value Competiton

Design Intentions

Budgeting & Architec...

Building Relationships

Art with Plumbing

Having Your Own Pla...

Communicate Early...

The 7 Phases of Fab...

SDOB

Art Intertwined with th...

Can You Please Every...

Building with Kultur

Studio Dynamic

Creative Power_Brain...

The Three Schedules...

Building New on Indig...

Women in Charge

A Sunday Afternoon in...

Designing in the Mod...

Thriving on Collaborati...

Looking at the Whole...

Studio Desk 101

Meet the Team

Making Competence

FAT: Flexible, Adapt...

Architect's Self Evalu...

Benefits of Design B...

The Truth in the Deta...

Studio Expansion: W...

design+make apprec...

Optimistic Continge...

Wood 101

Client Conversation:...

Great Expectations

The Future of Dry Fit...

Communication Brea...

Design Matters

Prototyping as a Tool

Expressive Diagraming

Blood, Sweat, and Provi...

design+make+sustain

A Departure From Fine ...

Facility Optimization as...

The Need for Quality C...

design+makeDISCUSSION

Macro / Micro

Taking a Public Interest

Conditional Making

Efficiency

Holding it Together

Keys to Graphic Commu...

This Program Has Been...

Expanded Partnerships...

Preserving Graduate Le...

Careful Consideration o...

Making the Switch

Pushing Back on the Be...

Roof_Ground_Winner

Girl Scout Camp Assesm...

Since the energy crisis’s in the 1970’s, our society has been concerned with energy efficiency. Since then, our economic output has more than tripled, while our energy demand has only increased 50%. There has been a push for architects to improve our buildings- by polluting less through construction and reducing energy costs during building operation...  (more)